Biosecurity

Biosecurity is fundamental for safeguarding our valuable agricultural resources against the threat and impacts of pests, weeds and diseases (pests).

Biosecurity is the management of the risk of animal and plant pests and diseases entering, emerging, establishing or spreading in Western Australia, to protect our economy, environment and the community.

To protect Western Australian agricultural industries from pests the Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia:

  • Works with stakeholders to identify and manage biosecurity risks.
  • Develops legislation.
  • Establishes import controls.
  • Conducts inspections.
  • Provides quarantine services as required.

To find out more about what we do to protect agricultural production and export opportunities within the State please search our website.

Articles

  • ‘Calf scours’ is when young calves develop diarrhoea and become dehydrated. The scour can be white, yellow, grey or blood-stained, and is often foul-smelling.

  • A key component of live animal exports is the health certification that demonstrates to the importing country that the livestock meet market requirements.

  • All livestock producers should take steps to prevent ruminant livestock accessing meat or animal products.

  • Ehrlichiosis is a disease of dogs that occurs when a brown dog tick infected with the bacteria, Ehrlichia canis, bites a dog.

  • Registration of owners and identification of livestock in Western Australia is required by law under the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management (Identification and Movement of Stock and Apiaries) R

  • Some pig owners may not be aware that feeding meat and meat products to pigs is illegal in Australia because it could introduce devastating diseases to pigs and other livestock.

  • In Australia it is illegal to feed animal matter to cattle, sheep, goats, deer, alpacas and other ruminant animals. These restrictions are a key part of Australia's ruminant feed ban.

  • All livestock entering Western Australia are legally required to comply with the state's conditions of entry. Some stock are required undergo post-entry treatments, testing or inspections.

  • There are three strains of the bacteria, Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, that cause Johne’s disease (JD): sheep/ovine (S-), cattle (C-/bovine) and bison strains.

  • Johne’s disease (JD) is an incurable infectious disease of ruminants including cattle, sheep, goats, alpaca and deer. It causes chronic diarrhoea and wasting, which eventually leads to death.

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