Biosecurity

Biosecurity is fundamental for safeguarding our valuable agricultural resources against the threat and impacts of pests, weeds and diseases (pests).

Biosecurity is the management of the risk of animal and plant pests and diseases entering, emerging, establishing or spreading in Western Australia, to protect our economy, environment and the community.

To protect Western Australian agricultural industries from pests the Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia:

  • Works with stakeholders to identify and manage biosecurity risks.
  • Develops legislation.
  • Establishes import controls.
  • Conducts inspections.
  • Provides quarantine services as required.

To find out more about what we do to protect agricultural production and export opportunities within the State please search our website.

Articles

  • The Plant and Plant Product Traceability Project commenced in 2021, and is part of a national initiative to improve traceability within the agricultural sectors.

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development's Quarantine WA service works hard to prevent the introduction of exotic pests, diseases and weeds found in other states and territorie

  • Western Australia is free of most of the significant diseases that affect animals in other parts of the world.

  • Serpentine leaf miner (Liriomyza huidobrensis) is a tiny fly whose larvae (grubs) damage plants by tunnelling through the inside of leaves.

  • Green snail (Cornu apertus) is a declared pest under section 22 of the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007.

  • Brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) is not found in Australia, but poses a high biosecurity risk due to their tendency to hitchhike in sea cargo and their highly mobile nature.

  • Brown marmorated stink bug (Halyomorpha halys) is a mottle brown coloured, shield shaped stink bug.

  • Codling moth (Cydia pomonella) is a serious pest of apples and other pome fruit and has the potential to cause severe crop losses.

  • Dothistroma needle blight (Dothistroma septosporum) causes needle loss, slow growth and sometimes death in many types of pine and some related conifers.

  • Fire blight (Erwinia amylovora) is a serious bacterial disease of apples, pears and other plants in the rose family (Rosaceae). This disease is not present in Western Australia.

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