Biosecurity

Biosecurity is fundamental for safeguarding our valuable agricultural resources against the threat and impacts of pests, weeds and diseases (pests).

Biosecurity is the management of the risk of animal and plant pests and diseases entering, emerging, establishing or spreading in Western Australia, to protect our economy, environment and the community.

To protect Western Australian agricultural industries from pests the Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia:

  • Works with stakeholders to identify and manage biosecurity risks.
  • Develops legislation.
  • Establishes import controls.
  • Conducts inspections.
  • Provides quarantine services as required.

To find out more about what we do to protect agricultural production and export opportunities within the State please search our website.

Articles

  • Ground pearls are closely related to scale insects and can be serious pests of sugarcane and recreational turf.

  • Citrophilus mealybug (Pseudococcus calceolariae) is a serious pest of many horticultural crops that can downgrade fruit quality and affect fruit production.

  • The European wasp is considered one of the worst wasps in the world - harmful to people, our outdoor lifestyle and to our horticultural and agricultural industries.

  • A scientifically proven method of pest insect control, the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) uses the mass rearing, sterilisation, and release of Queensland fruit fly (Qfly) in targeted areas.

  • Measures approved by the Department’s Chief Plant Biosecurity Officer for commercially produced host fruit or plants moved from the wider quarantine area to other areas within Western Australia, fo

  • Queensland fruit fly (Qfly, Bactrocera tryoni) is considered to be one of the most serious pests of fruit and vegetables in Australia.

  • Pigeon rotavirus was first detected in Western Australia as a result of investigation of a disease outbreak in racing pigeons in May and June 2016.

  • Serpentine leaf miner (Liriomyza huidobrensis) is a tiny fly whose larvae (grubs) damage plants by tunnelling through the inside of leaves.

  • The Western Australian (WA) cattle tick control program is managed by the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) to protect the viability of the cattle industry and safeg

  • Onion smut (Urocystis cepulae) is a disease of onions. This disease is absent from Western Australia.

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