Biosecurity

Biosecurity is fundamental for safeguarding our valuable agricultural resources against the threat and impacts of pests, weeds and diseases (pests).

Biosecurity is the management of the risk of animal and plant pests and diseases entering, emerging, establishing or spreading in Western Australia, to protect our economy, environment and the community.

To protect Western Australian agricultural industries from pests the Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia:

  • Works with stakeholders to identify and manage biosecurity risks.
  • Develops legislation.
  • Establishes import controls.
  • Conducts inspections.
  • Provides quarantine services as required.

To find out more about what we do to protect agricultural production and export opportunities within the State please search our website.

Articles

  • Most bait products registered for use on wild dogs in Western Australia use sodium fluoroacetate (1080) as their active ingredient. Landholders have certain obligations under the code of practice f

  • Identification of livestock is required by law under the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management (Identification and Movement of Stock and Apiaries) Regulations 2013 [BAM (IMSA) Regulations].

  • The Animal Biosecurity and Welfare program within the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) manages evidence-based systems to maintain and verify our high animal health,

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development conducts a surveillance program for ewe abortion and newborn lamb deaths to assist sheep producers to identify the cause of abortions a

  • Producing chickens or eggs on land treated or contaminated with organochlorines (OC) is not recommended for domestic consumption or commercial purposes.

  • Western Australia's access to livestock and livestock product export markets, worth about $2 billion annually, relies on Australia being free of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD).

  • Hendra virus is an emergency animal disease transmitted to horses by flying foxes (fruit bats).

  • Bluetongue virus can infect all ruminants but it usually only causes serious disease in sheep. Cattle may be infected with the virus but rarely show disease.

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) is responsible for regulating the labels of stockfeed supplied in Western Australia to ensure they provide the required informa

  • Identification of livestock is required by law under the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management (Identification and Movement of Stock and Apiaries) Regulations 2013 [BAM (IMSA) Regulations].

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