Biosecurity

Biosecurity is fundamental for safeguarding our valuable agricultural resources against the threat and impacts of pests, weeds and diseases (pests).

Biosecurity is the management of the risk of animal and plant pests and diseases entering, emerging, establishing or spreading in Western Australia, to protect our economy, environment and the community.

To protect Western Australian agricultural industries from pests the Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia:

  • Works with stakeholders to identify and manage biosecurity risks.
  • Develops legislation.
  • Establishes import controls.
  • Conducts inspections.
  • Provides quarantine services as required.

To find out more about what we do to protect agricultural production and export opportunities within the State please search our website.

Articles

  • Australia is free of many infectious horse diseases, sparing horse owners from costly disease control. The occurrence of an emergency horse disease could severely restrict horse movements, racing a

  • Early recognition of disease is one of the most important factors influencing the control of disease and the reduction of its impact on industry and the community.

  • The Western Australian horse industry is committed to helping owners keep their horses and properties disease-free through the adoption of effective biosecurity measures.

  • Screw worm fly is considered the most serious exotic pest threatening Australia's livestock industries and could cost up to $500 million a year in lost production and control measures if it entered

  • Newcastle disease is a severe viral disease of poultry and other birds.

  • The Northern Australia Biosecurity Surveillance (NABS) project is a coordinated surveillance program to enhance the early detection of exotic disease incursions and to provide sufficient surveillan

  • Caution: Anthrax is a serious zoonotic disease.

  • In Western Australia, commercial poultry owners must comply with surveillance, reporting and biosecurity requirements in order to reduce the risk of Newcastle disease being introduced to their floc

  • Classical rabies occurs in most parts of the world but is exotic to Australia. Biosecurity Australia has strategies in place to minimise the risk of classical rabies entering Australia.

  • If an emergency animal disease such as foot-and-mouth disease was found in Australia, a national livestock standstill would be implemented immediately.

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