Biosecurity

Biosecurity is fundamental for safeguarding our valuable agricultural resources against the threat and impacts of pests, weeds and diseases (pests).

Biosecurity is the management of the risk of animal and plant pests and diseases entering, emerging, establishing or spreading in Western Australia, to protect our economy, environment and the community.

To protect Western Australian agricultural industries from pests the Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia:

  • Works with stakeholders to identify and manage biosecurity risks.
  • Develops legislation.
  • Establishes import controls.
  • Conducts inspections.
  • Provides quarantine services as required.

To find out more about what we do to protect agricultural production and export opportunities within the State please search our website.

Articles

  • The plants identified here have the potential to cause significant damage to Western Australia's pastoral industry and to the unique biodiversity of the rangelands.

  • Measurements of water quality and quantity are required for effective planning and monitoring of water supplies for livestock.

  • Agistment is an option for removing livestock from a property, for a number of reasons – after a fire, when paddock feed is inadequate, to spell pastures, or to finish livestock for sale on better

  • Legislation regulating the poultry industry covers a wide array of issues ranging from disease control, food health and safety, the environment (odour and noise emissions), to agricultural chemical

  • The aim of the eConnected Grainbelt Project is to make a real difference to growers’ businesses and the grains industry.

  • As part of the successful Getting Value from Farm Data Networks grower group forum at Technology Park, Bentley, four high quality speakers presented to about 70 attendees.

  • Managing farm biosecurity following a fire, flood or dry season is a balance of caring for livestock and paddocks while limiting the introduction of new pests, diseases or weeds onto the property.

  • Chickens can be a great asset to any small landholding. They provide eggs, produce fertiliser, control insects and weeds, eat kitchen scraps and loosen soil while scratching.

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