Biosecurity

Biosecurity is fundamental for safeguarding our valuable agricultural resources against the threat and impacts of pests, weeds and diseases (pests).

Biosecurity is the management of the risk of animal and plant pests and diseases entering, emerging, establishing or spreading in Western Australia, to protect our economy, environment and the community.

To protect Western Australian agricultural industries from pests the Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia:

  • Works with stakeholders to identify and manage biosecurity risks.
  • Develops legislation.
  • Establishes import controls.
  • Conducts inspections.
  • Provides quarantine services as required.

To find out more about what we do to protect agricultural production and export opportunities within the State please search our website.

Articles

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) has commenced the extension of the State Barrier Fence eastwards from its current termination point near Ravensthorpe, extendin

  • Western Australia's State Barrier Fence plays an important role in preventing animal pests such as wild dogs from moving into the State's agricultural areas from pastoral areas in the east.

  • Blue-green algae are a group of algae including Nodularia spumigena, Microcystis aeruginosa and Anabaena circinalis.

  • ‘Calf scours’ is when young calves develop diarrhoea and become dehydrated. The scour can be white, yellow, grey or blood-stained, and is often foul-smelling.

  • All ruminants (including sheep, cattle and goats) require cobalt in their diet for the synthesis of vitamin B12.

  • Photosensitisation is inflammation of the skin, and occasionally the conjunctiva and cornea of the eye.

  • Botulism is a rapid onset, usually fatal disease caused by the botulinum toxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum.

  • Big improvements in wild dog management and agricultural pest animal control resulted from Royalties for Regions funds allocated in 2010 and 2011.

  • There are many causes of anaemia, jaundice and abortion in cattle, including bovine anaemia due to Theileria orientalis group (BATOG).

  • A grower suvey and benefit cost analysis on the State Barrier Fence has demonstrated the positive impact the fence is having on wild dog management.