Biosecurity

Biosecurity is fundamental for safeguarding our valuable agricultural resources against the threat and impacts of pests, weeds and diseases (pests).

Biosecurity is the management of the risk of animal and plant pests and diseases entering, emerging, establishing or spreading in Western Australia, to protect our economy, environment and the community.

To protect Western Australian agricultural industries from pests the Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia:

  • Works with stakeholders to identify and manage biosecurity risks.
  • Develops legislation.
  • Establishes import controls.
  • Conducts inspections.
  • Provides quarantine services as required.

To find out more about what we do to protect agricultural production and export opportunities within the State please search our website.

Articles

  • Ovine brucellosis is a reproductive disease that can affect all breeds of sheep.

  • Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia (DAFWA) approved procedure for detection of trematode eggs and Eimeria leuckarti sedimentation method (FEST) on faecal samples.

  • The “agriculture weed surveillance in the south west” project’s key goal was to develop capacity for surveillance of high priority declared weeds that impact agriculture and investigate options to

  • There are multiple possible causes of both infertility and abortion in ewes, but making a definitive diagnosis is often difficult. Some diseases which are exotic to Australia can cause abortions.

  • The Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS) provides advisory and identification services on animal and plant pests, weeds and diseases that impact Western Australia's agriculture and food ind

  • The importation of livestock into Western Australia and checking of imported livestock at the border is carried out by Quarantine WA (QWA).

    Contact details for QWA are outlined below.

  • Johne’s disease (JD) is an incurable infectious disease of ruminants including cattle, sheep, goats, alpaca and deer. It causes chronic diarrhoea and wasting, which eventually leads to death.

  • There are three strains of the bacteria, Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, that cause Johne’s disease (JD): sheep/ovine (S-), cattle (C-/bovine) and bison strains.

  • C-strain of Johne's disease (JD) in cattle is not known to be present in Western Australia.

  • Anthrax is a bacterial disease of animals, most commonly seen in cattle, sheep and goats.

Filter by search

Filter by topic