Invasive species

Many exotic animals and plants become invasive species if they manage to establish populations in new areas. The ways in which these pests are introduced vary widely, but they are often the result of accidental or deliberate human activities.

Whatever their means of arrival, invasive species can have an adverse and often very damaging impact on agriculture, the natural environment and our lifestyle.

The Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia's (DAFWA) Invasive Species Program provides leadership for strategic and operational management of serious weeds and pest animals that pose a threat to agriculture, related environmental resources, and market accessibility for agricultural produce in Western Australia (WA).

DAFWA's Plant Biosecurity Program provides leadership for strategic and operational management of serious diseases and pests of plants that pose a threat to agriculture and market accessibility for agricultural produce in WA.

Articles

  • This article contains the booklet '1080 landholder information' and provides a general summary of a landholder’s obligations under the code of practice for the saf

  • Big improvements in wild dog management and agricultural pest animal control resulted from Royalties for Regions funds allocated in 2010 and 2011.

  • Indian ringneck parakeets are declared pests with the potential to damage cereals, oilseeds, horticulture as well as stored grains, and even backyard fruit and trees.

  • Skeleton weed (Chondrilla juncea) is a declared pest in Western Australia (WA).

Filter by search

Filter by topic