Invasive species

Many exotic animals and plants become invasive species if they manage to establish populations in new areas. The ways in which these pests are introduced vary widely, but they are often the result of accidental or deliberate human activities.

Whatever their means of arrival, invasive species can have an adverse and often very damaging impact on agriculture, the natural environment and our lifestyle.

The Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia's (DAFWA) Invasive Species Program provides leadership for strategic and operational management of serious weeds and pest animals that pose a threat to agriculture, related environmental resources, and market accessibility for agricultural produce in Western Australia (WA).

DAFWA's Plant Biosecurity Program provides leadership for strategic and operational management of serious diseases and pests of plants that pose a threat to agriculture and market accessibility for agricultural produce in WA.

Articles

  • A grower suvey and benefit cost analysis on the State Barrier Fence has demonstrated the positive impact the fence is having on wild dog management.

  • Western Australia's State Barrier Fence plays an important role in preventing animal pests such as wild dogs from moving into the State's agricultural areas from pastoral areas in the east.

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) proposes to extend the State Barrier Fence eastwards from its current termination point near Ravensthorpe, extending north arou

  • Big improvements in wild dog management and agricultural pest animal control resulted from Royalties for Regions funds allocated in 2010 and 2011.